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Digital Camera Reviews

Updated: Aug 22, 2019 07:04

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#1
alaScore 100

Nikon Z6

With the Z6, Nikon set out to beat Sony at its own mirrorless game. While it didn't quite succeed...

34 expert reviews | 4 user reviews

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#2
alaScore 99

Nikon Z7

So who won the debut mirrorless full-frame camera shootout between Nikon and Canon? I'd have to...

47 expert reviews | 4 user reviews

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#3
alaScore 99

Sony Alpha a6400

Sony's A6400 is a mixed bag. It's essentially a rebadged A6300 with the same sensor and thus the...

23 expert reviews

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#4
alaScore 98

Sony Alpha a7 III

The Sony Alpha A7 III might not have the highest resolution, fastest shooting speed or best video...

51 expert reviews | 175 user reviews

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#5
alaScore 98

Fujifilm X-T3

The X-T3 has that Fujifilm mystique with a small, pretty body and numerous dials for manual...

38 expert reviews | 7 user reviews

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#6
alaScore 98

Leica Q2

The Leica Q2 is Leica's best camera. Or, at least, it's the easiest to justify. It's objectively...

11 expert reviews

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#7
alaScore 97

Sony Alpha a9

The Sony a9 is a big step forward for mirrorless technology. It betters the fastest, most...

47 expert reviews | 1 user reviews

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#8
alaScore 97

Fujifilm X-H1

Impressively well designed and built ; 5-axis in-body image stabilization ; Cinema 4K video at...

38 expert reviews | 3 user reviews

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#9
alaScore 97

Sony Alpha a7R III

Its only real rival is the superb Nikon D850, and which you choose may depend on whether you...

43 expert reviews | 8 user reviews

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#10
alaScore 97

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI

Bottom Line: The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI delivers premium image quality, fit and finish, and...

25 expert reviews | 71 user reviews

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#11
alaScore 97

Canon EOS Rebel SL3 / Canon EOS 250D

The Canon EOS 250D / Rebel SL3 is a rather modest upgrade of the 2-year-old Canon EOS 200D /...

11 expert reviews | 4 user reviews

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#12
alaScore 97

Fujifilm GFX 50R

It’s hard to make the rational case for a camera like the GFX. It’s a fantastic machine that can...

60 expert reviews

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#13
alaScore 97

Canon EOS RP

If I was shopping for a camera in that budget range, I'd be seriously tempted by Fujifilm's $1...

25 expert reviews | 1 user reviews

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#14
alaScore 97

Panasonic Lumix DC-LX100 II

Bottom Line: The Panasonic Lumix DC-LX100 II has a better image sensor than the original, but we...

22 expert reviews | 10 user reviews

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#15
alaScore 96

Fujifilm GFX 100

From the point of view of image quality alone, the GFX 100 is the best camera we've ever reviewed...

7 expert reviews

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#16
alaScore 96

Nikon D850

The Nikon D850 is the first DSLR that truly fits both speed and resolution in the same camera.

58 expert reviews | 28 user reviews

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#17
alaScore 96

Nikon D3500

Bottom Line: The Nikon D3500 doesn't offer a lot of upgrades, but cements its value as a strong...

16 expert reviews | 37 user reviews

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#18
alaScore 96

Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9

Great build quality ; Intelligent control layout ; 80MP high-resolution mode ; 5-axis in-body...

34 expert reviews | 90 user reviews

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#19
alaScore 96

Nikon D7500

Nikon's new D7500 isn't as beastly as the D500, but it still packs a serious bite.

49 expert reviews | 47 user reviews

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#20
alaScore 96

Olympus OM-D E-M1X

'Let's not join 'em, let's beat 'em!' - is what I imagine someone at Olympus shouting when the E...

19 expert reviews | 1 user reviews

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#21
alaScore 96

Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5S

Panasonic's GH5s mirrorless camera sets a new standard for mirrorless video. The multi-aspect...

31 expert reviews

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#22
alaScore 96

Fujifilm X-E3

With a higher resolution sensor, faster processor, much-improved autofocus, 4K video, and a sleek...

35 expert reviews | 13 user reviews

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#23
alaScore 96

Canon EOS R

Bottom Line: Canon's first full-frame mirrorless camera, the EOS R, offers strong image quality...

38 expert reviews | 5 user reviews

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#24
alaScore 96

Panasonic Lumix DC-FZ1000 II

Back in mid-2014, Panasonic made its debut in the large-sensor, long-zoom camera market with the...

6 expert reviews

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#25
alaScore 96

Canon EOS M50

It's about time that Canon added 4K to a consumer camera—it's currently only available in the pro...

32 expert reviews | 71 user reviews

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    Buying Guide

    Buying Guide - Digital Cameras

    Compact digital cameras have become trend now in popularity, and consumer enthusiasm for the advantages offered by digital models shows no sign of changing. Many consumers are asking themselves what kind of digital camera they need? More and more are embracing digital compact cameras as their model of choice.



    Contents

    Digital Compact Camera Advantages

    The size of a credit card, and not weighing much more, digital compact cameras come packed with options like video recording and touch-screen displays. They offer the versatility of a standard digital camera and the portability of a cell phone.

    When compared against standard film cameras, the advantages of digital compact cameras are obvious. The savings in money and time are enormous! The cost of film and developing it are both removed, and there is no more waiting hours or days to get your photos back from the developer. There is also no more wondering whether you got the shot you wanted – you can always check your photographs and immediately know if you have that precious memory saved, or if you need another shot to capture it forever.

    When compared against digital SLR cameras, there are also a number of distinct advantages to owning a compact digital camera:

    Cost: Digital compact cameras are much less expensive than digital SLR cameras. You will be getting more bang for your buck with a compact model.

    Point and Shoot: Digital compact cameras are designed to be easy to use in all conditions, and for a wide range of applications. There is no fussing with different settings for different types of pictures, and no need to be schooled in the principles of professional photography – you just point and shoot, and the camera takes care of the rest for you!

    Easy to Share Pictures: Digital compact cameras offer less resolution than digital SLR cameras, but this is not the disadvantage that it might seem to be. This reduced resolution is usually not noticeable and still more than sufficient for 99% of your photography needs, but has the immediate benefit of smaller file size per picture. This makes it easy to quickly email, upload, and share your photographs. The bulky picture files created by SLRs can take a long time to upload, even with DSL or broadband service – digital compact camera photo files are designed to make sharing them a snap!

    What to Look for in a Digital Compact Camera

    Resolution – Most digital compact cameras on the market have sufficiently high resolution that you don't need to worry about too few pixels. If you plan on blowing up pictures to a larger size, or taking more detailed photos, go for 10mp or more. But remember more megapixels does not necessarily mean better photo quality. In digital compact cameras, manufacturers increase resolution for marketing and cost reasons, rarely for quality reasons.

    Zoom – Most compact digital cameras come with a zoom feature – optically, digitally or both. Optical zoom measures the ability of the camera's lens and other parts to capture more light, and more detail, from a particular faraway point. Digital zoom crops the image and resizes it, giving the same effect as optical zoom but significantly reducing picture quality. If you shoot lots of close-ups, pick a camera with a high optical zoom and blow up the picture later with image editing software like Photoshop.

    Battery Life – Battery life is measured by how many pictures you can take on a single charge – from 100 to more than 450. Digital compact cameras drain batteries at different rates, so think about your shooting habits. Are you outdoors or at home? Do you have access to an outlet or not? Buy accordingly. Battery life is usually good for all digital compact cameras, but get a model that features extended battery life if you anticipate a long time passing between charges.

    Shutter Lag – It's the time between clicking the shutter button and the camera taking the picture, can range from 0.22 second to nearly two seconds. Pick the camera that suits your habits. You can hold still for a portrait, but you don't want to miss your child scoring a goal at school match.

    Storage – High-megapixel cameras take great photos, but they also eat lots of memory. Most digital compact cameras ship with a relatively small memory card. Update to at least a 1GB (2GB or more is better) card to get the most out of your sessions.

    Additional Features – Digital compact cameras with video capabilities are much in demand, and the difference in price is very modest. If you plan on taking your camera hiking, biking, or in harsh weather conditions, choose a sturdy, water-resistant model. Snapshots are usually taken on the fly without perfect composition or ideal lighting. A few features in particular can turn snap-photos into great photos.

    • Red-eye reduction eliminates the annoying glare in eyes, which occurs when the flash reflects off the retinas. (Note: red-eye reduction slightly increases shutter lag.)
    • To avoid camera shake, the blurred effect from subtle movements when shooting in low light or while zoomed, pick a compact digital camera with image stabilization (IS). IS digitally counteracts those subtle movements to shoot a clear picture.
    • Facial recognition software centers on a subject's face, and adjusts aperture and shutter speed accordingly, making the face the focus of the shot. Or take it one step further with Sony's smile recognition feature – the camera focuses on the person's smile.

    Popular Digital Compact Camera Brands

    Nikon, Canon, and Olympus are names that need no introduction in the world of photography – their digital compact camera models are at the top of the field for both price and performance. FujiFilm has several very well-reviewed models at a number of different performance levels. Pentax and Panasonic have made an effort to focus on value, and they have a number of good entry-level models. Sony and Ricoh have several high-end models that offer outstanding performance and bridge the gap into the digital SLR range of cameras.

    Popular Digital Camera products

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    Digital Cameras on alaTest

    alaTest.com has collected and analyzed millions of reviews from 2774 sources to help you choose the best Digital Camera from top brands like Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic, Samsung and more.

    Buying Tips Read our Buying Guide
    before you make your purchase